What is IT?

What is IT? It’s hard to know.
To know IT, you must listen close.

Like when someone says they’ve got IT,
does it mean they understand?

You may yell “I’ve got IT!” when you’re catching balls.
Or are you warning others you may have caught a cold?

So many meanings for one word,
it’s no wonder other languages think we’re mad.

They will surely lose IT trying to understand.
You’re wondering now if I will get to IT

Or if I’m very with IT,
to write a poem about IT.

Has someone already done IT?
What a silly concept, to write about IT.

Well IT is lots of things,
as luck would have IT.

Refers to anything,
that’s the size of IT.

This is lots of fun,
isn’t IT?

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Summer Fade

Days are dimming the air has a chill
Of swimming and games children have had their fill

Their skin tells adventures in tanned feet and freckled nose
Legs scratched and bit, pinkish arms and dirty toes

Time to trim the lightened hair, measure shoes and get to sleep
Looking forward to friendships, making new ones to keep

It is a beckoning we cannot resist, the ritual of Autumn’s kiss
The rustle of leaves quieting the birds and frogs of summer’s bliss

To ants and worms that crawled in and out, we bid farewell friends
On the other side of winter’s throes we will meet again

Daily Prompt: Fifteen Credits

Granny Rally

Photo credit where credit is due.

Photo credit where credit is due.

Here’s the final, kid-approved version, from a previous post entitled “Look Who’s at the Rally!” I had to get through my almost 8-year-old editor.

Granny Rally (Take 3)

Ladies and gentlemen get on your feet, in comes the granny rally!
They’ve come from miles and miles, ready to ride, Cadillac style
Line ’em up and watch ’em go, those V8’s will put on a show.
Now they’re off, sharp turn ’round the bend, rev it up and back again.
Grandma Elsie’s in the lead, but Grandma Cathy is looking mean
Coming up from behind, she zips in front, doing fine.
It’s Grandma Cathy for the win, with family cheering, she takes her spin.

Wishes

Be careful what you wish for, oh so true
What if good fortune came to you
with missed chance to build anew
and lessons learned out of view

What would you do with better times
Sit back relax, enjoy some wine
Lose your drive, it’ll be just fine
Line it up and count what’s mine

With this wish would you be satisfied
or look at others and still wonder why
they have riches piled high
and you have so little, or so you cry

Like a child in a toy store
You want and pout and beg for more
Yet the hole will deepen as you ignore
Life’s blessings already at your door

No one said it would be easy to do
When funds are low and friends seem few
But you have heard it a time or two
Real happiness is up to you.

Life’s a struggle there is no doubt
It’s a lonely run when you’re without
So get to work, enjoy the drought
In the end, health and happiness is what it’s all about

A rich man I once knew
died in his sleep, he was old it’s true
On that day, all the riches mattered few
except for richness of family and comfort too

What will you have when your time is up
Will you look back and say that was more than enough
We all come in the same way and go out too
What happens ‘between is up to you.

Granny Rally Take 2!

Please see edit notes and redo below. According to my editor, this was all wrong.

At the hot rod rally,  cars with chrome are right at home. Exhaust pipes fire, squeallin’ tires. Gears turning, rubber burning. That’s the usual fun, but look out muscles, you’ve got competition.

Move aside and part the seas, in comes the granny rally! They come from miles, all Cadillacs and smiles. Silent and stealthy, looky there it’s Grandma Elsie! Line ’em up and watch ’em go, those V8’s will put on a show. Lots of horsepower and a cushy seat makes grandma’s ride the one to beat!

August 18 late pm: I was told by my son this was all wrong. Apparently I should have left out any reference to the hot rod rally. He asked me what all that zooming vrooming was (i.e. tires burning etc. – hey I’ve never used i.e. and etc in the same sentence) and shook his head with a pregnant pause, (quite a long pregnant pause). He said it should have been just the granny rally, with descriptions of obstacles in their course, and their families cheering them in the stands. He said the ending just dropped off and I should have made it a gradual decline and announced his grandma’s win at the end. OK, I’ve got some work to do. Granny Rally is an idea I came up with after attending a rally in our town. Those Devilles are everywhere, and they are serious cars. My own Mom has one and let’s just say she’s safer in it than those around her on the road!  He thought it was a hilarious idea and we’ve been joking about it for weeks. So, here goes (ZZzzzz I want to be sleeping!)

The Granny Rally (Take 2)

Ladies and gentlemen get on your feet, in comes the granny rally!
They’ve come from miles, ready to ride Cadillac style
Racing for their families who’re packed in the stands abundantly.
Line ’em up and watch ’em go, those V8’s will put on a show.
Now they’re off, sharp turn around the bend, through the bumpers and back again.
Grandma Elsie’s in the lead, but Grandma Cathy is looking mean
Coming up from behind, she’s zips in front, doing fine.
It’s Grandma Cathy for the win, with family cheering she takes her victory spin.

I’m sure I’ll be sent back for more editing, but we’ll see what he thinks in the morning.

Freaky Friday: A Girl Who Was Me

Daily Prompt: Freaky Friday

If I could trade places with anyone, it would be me at 22-years-old. I would like her to see me now, and I would like to remember.

Remember my body, my hair, my face. I would like to look in the mirror and laugh at what I did not always know was beautiful. I would tell my reflection I was the most gorgeous thing I’d ever seen. I would style my hair super big and poofy, just because I could, or pull it back in a slick, long ponytail. I would reach back with my flexible arms and enjoy the feel of it low on my back.

I would go for a run, and I would amaze myself. Then I would stay out all night dancing with my friends and I would look good with my moves which are so right on a 22-year-old’s body. I would bask in the attention I received from boys my age, thank them and politely tell them I’m not that kind of girl if they tried to get too close. I would find the nice guy who wasn’t drinking too much and ask him if he wanted to go for a walk by the waterfront. We would talk about our lives and what we hoped to achieve and I would say I’m going to take life as it comes. I enjoy traveling and want to have adventures while I’m young. I don’t care about money or my past. I want to surround myself by people who care about me and leave the rest behind. He would walk me home and nervously ask me for my phone number.

When I arrived at my apartment, my friends would ask me all about it and I would savor every second, living with my best girlfriends. I would tell them they are beautiful and I would listen to all of their hopes and dreams. I would not care if they ate my peanut butter out of the jar with a spoon or their fingers, or if they left dishes in the sink. I would be a silly girl and I would enjoy the evening. They would think I was crazy in love, but I would be crazy happy just to be near them. I would not be thinking too much about the boy by the waterfront because 22-years-old is much too young to care about that, until I found someone who really deserved me.

Before I went to bed I’d write myself a letter. I’d tell myself to enjoy every second and not let life’s cares bring me down. Don’t get too excited either, just take it easy. Be kind to others even when they fail you, because they are human and it has nothing to do with you. You are wonderful and amazing. You are right where you need to be.

I would call my Dad and say hi. He’d be up because he was like that, he wouldn’t even notice the time. He’d ask me about my night out and reminisce about his own nights out, when he was young. He would be young, only 57. I would have to hang up then.

At this point, I’d realize all I have to be blessed with in my life, all the struggles and joys which transformed my body and my mind. I’d be ready to go back. When I returned to my older self I’d find a note, written in purple ink. It’d say we have done amazingly. What a beautiful son and house. I can’t believe this is our life. I never would have imagined some of the friends that stuck with us, or the ones that didn’t, that’s hard to take. We had our hearts broken sometimes. Did we go to Ireland on our honeymoon? I’m glad you divorced him. He was cute but, you can do better. And did we really do all that schooling, and do that for work? Our boy is so amazing, he gives me hope for my future, I can’t wait to hold him again. You must be so happy. We have more than I ever dreamed of.

And that’s it. I would be compelled to embrace life with confidence and assurance that it’s all good because someday I will be 20 years older and that lady would tell this woman to enjoy.

I Can’t Buy 55

“Are you at least 55?” she automated.

“What?” I think, I stutter. Maybe it was out loud, I don’t know. I have never been asked if I’m in my fifties. Until just a few years ago I was asked for my identification to enter bars. I am 42-years-old. Before I allow myself to be offended, I allow my senses to register the flat tone with which she delivered the offending question, the blank stare. The setting, The Dollar Store. We are buying a $1 dollar toy, my 7-year-old son and I.

“What?” I implore, my senses stunned, now recovering. I focus my gaze on her face, searching. Is it an automatic question at the Yankee Dollar Store? Do I appear older than I am? For a second I realize she looks older than she should for a young girl, the years of a hard life reveal her future. I am detective, seeking information, some bit of rational thought to lessen the blow of this devastating question.

“Are you at least 55 years old?” she repeats. My pride hastily answers for me, “No.” With that information she is able to proceed and turn her attention back to the mechanics of completing the sale. I would say she turned her eyes away from me, but it would be more apt to say they just fell away, eased back into their listless stare.

“Wait,” I command. “Is that for a discount?”

She glances in my direction, a barely perceptible confirmation that yes, she is offering me a senior discount, and I can see I’ve caused her great discomfort to look back at me. She was thinking about her own life troubles, her job at Yankee Dollar, how many minutes until her next cigarette break. She does not perceive me or my youthful vigor, she is unseeing.

“I should have said I am…at least 55-years-old,” I offer, cheerfully. The confusion on her face tells me this is not a joke she gets. There is a half-question on her face, the semblance of confusion in her now inwardly turned eyes. It does not take much to make a turtle hide in its shell. I release her from this state by explaining I need to shop with an older friend to get the discount. I crack a smile, she completes the sale.

I realize I would have just sold my pride for a discount on a dollar item. Oh well, next time.

I wish you luck

Oh to what blessed winds do I owe my current fortune spins?

Luck be not an easy friend who bestows only kindness therein

She provides equal chances at mirth and merry

as she does at toiling drudge and contrary

if you only choose to count bad as much as good

then you will have ample chances to declare the mood

Good luck or bad luck, whichever it will be, it is luck just the same

Random happenings in the plan, a helpless victim, or fortunes remain

Questions

“When it’s winter do ladybugs go inside?
Do you know where they might hide?
Have you seen a two-dollar bill, is it real?”
Children are wise and curious.
They ask questions like “How can the moon follow and chase us?”

I am asked, “Why is there no floor thirteen?
“What is white chocolate?” and “What is unseen?”
Better be ready to know everything, or find it or invent it quite readily.
“Is zero an even or odd number?” will make you humble.
You will think, you will stumble.

“Does a frog have ears?”
Some I know, others I fear.
“Which comes first, static or electricity?”
At times the answers really do stump me,
but I figure out how phone lines reach other countries.

“Before I was born did I pick you (or you pick me)?”
“Do pets go to Heaven to keep grandparents company?”
You will question what you know.
Do you remember what you were told?
Did you ever ask “Will you be here when I am old?”

I have to look it up and learn too
when I’m asked ‘Is a cucumber a fruit?’
So many questions like ‘Where is the rainforest?’ and ‘Why do we cry?”
I wonder at kids wondering all the things they do
and mostly I wonder that grown-ups forget to wonder too.